Modern Medicine: Breast Cancer and Reconstruction - WMBB News 13 - The Panhandle's News Leader

Modern Medicine: Breast Cancer and Reconstruction

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Panama City Beach, Fla. -

Early detection is key when it comes to breast cancer.  That's why self-exams and mammograms are so important.  If a mastectomy is needed, women now have many options for reconstruction.

Terri Kasey is a breast cancer survivor.  

"I have a mammogram every year, but this one came back suspicious, and after a biopsy, they found it was malignant, and I needed to have a bilateral mastectomy," Kasey explains.

Kasey had the mastectomy, and then Dr. Andrew McAllister inserted tissue expanders as the first part of her breast reconstruction.  He says using tissue expanders and implants helps in reforming the breast structure without having to remove muscle and tissue from other parts of the body.

Dr. McAllister has a very personal reason for pursuing his career path.  "My mother was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1993, and at the time, there was not a lot of reconstruction in the area where she lived, and that's what drove me down the path of doing what I do."

He goes on to say, "One in eight women today are diagnosed.  We've come a long way with our reconstruction process, and if we can catch things early, the skies the limit."

Kasey knows first hand how important regular exams are in detecting breast cancer.

She says, "I had no symptoms and even though I had an annual mammogram since I was 40, it happened to me...and it could happen to anyone.  I felt it was not worth my life to not have the time to go get a mammogram."