Modern Medicine: Treating Back Pain - WMBB News 13 - The Panhandle's News Leader

Modern Medicine: Treating Back Pain

Posted: Updated:
  • What's Going AroundMore>>

  • What's Going Around - August 20th

    What's Going Around - August 20th

    Wednesday, August 20 2014 1:08 PM EDT2014-08-20 17:08:58 GMT
    We all dread getting that sore feeling in our throat. It can be one of the first signs we're getting sick.More >>
    We all dread getting that sore feeling in our throat. It can be one of the first signs we're getting sick.More >>
  • What's Going Around - August 12th

    What's Going Around - August 12th

    Wednesday, August 13 2014 12:02 AM EDT2014-08-13 04:02:37 GMT
    There's a stomach illness going around, and there are some symptoms you need to be aware of to keep your family healthy.More >>
    There's a stomach illness going around, and there are some symptoms you need to be aware of to keep your family healthy.More >>
Bay County, Fla. -

A new technology called InterFuse is used when a patient has a degenerated or damaged disk in the spine.  These problems with the disk can lead to extreme leg and back pain and loss of function.  That's why treatment is so crucial.

Michael Allen Campbell had problems with the disks in his spine that were pressing on the nerves, causing pain.

"I had very bad pain in my left leg, which I could not take anymore.  I was leaning, hunched over and leaning to the left a little.  I could not stand up straight at all," he says.

Neurosurgeon Dr. Cyril DeSilva says, "When he came to us, he was losing function in his legs and in severe pain, so he underwent an operation to repair this."

The operation involved opening up the spine, taking out the bad disk, and reconstructing it so Campbell's spine did not collapse.

Dr. DeSilva says, "To do that we placed a new device recently on the market to reconstruct his disk, maintain his height and alignment of his spine."

Dr. DeSilva is able to assemble the InterFuse device during surgery.  Because of this, he can make much smaller incisions than before.

"It preserves height and alignment, and height is important to many people.  Alignment allows the spine to bear weight," Dr. DeSilva explains.

Campbell says the pain prior to surgery was interfering with his ability to work, but he's now feeling great.

"I was relieved.  As soon as I was able to walk again, I was very happy that I wasn't hunched over, and I had no pain in my leg," he says.

Bay Medical-Sacred Heart is holding a free lower back pain seminar.  The seminar is on Thursday, November 7th at 5:30 p.m. in the Medical Office Building auditorium.  Dr. DeSilva will discuss lower back pain causes and treatments.  To make your reservation, call 747-6541.