Modern Medicine: Peripheral Arterial Disease - WMBB News 13 - The Panhandle's News Leader

Modern Medicine: Peripheral Arterial Disease

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Panama City, Fla. -

Peripheral Arterial Disease, or PAD, occurs when plaque forms in the arteries in areas other than the heart.  This can include the arteries down the legs, which leads to leg pain.

Jennifer Clark is a Physician Assistant at Vascular Associates.  She says those blockages lead to not only pain, but also difficulty healing.

"Usually when we find plaque in one place, you've got it somewhere else.  So people with heart disease are definitely at an increased risk of having PAD or vice versa," explains Clark. 

She says there are some conservative things you can do to try to prevent PAD, such as not smoking, watching your cholesterol, controlling your blood pressure and diabetes, eating healthy, and exercising.  When conservative methods don't help, a minimally invasive surgery can provide relief. 

Gulf Coast Regional Medical Center is hosting a Lunch and Learn event with Jennifer Clark on Peripheral Vascular Disease on Friday, February 28th from noon until 1 p.m.  She'll talk more about the symptoms and treatment options at the event.  To register, call 747-3600.