Modern Medicine: Robotic Hysterectomy - WMBB News 13 - The Panhandle's News Leader

Modern Medicine: Robotic Hysterectomy

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Panama City, Fla. -

With robotic hysterectomy, patients recover faster with less pain.  It means women can return to their life and family faster.

Dr. Justo Maqueira from Emerald Coast OBGYN used the da Vinci Surgical System to perform the robotic surgery.

"The advantages of robotics and any type of robotic surgery is that the surgery is done more precise, there's usually a lot less blood loss, and the hospital stay is usually outpatient," Dr. Maqueira explains. 

The robotic arms are put inside the patient using small incisions.  The surgeon then sits at a console and maneuvers the arms while looking into a three-dimensional scope.

Dr. Maqueira says, "You're in control of everything the robot does as far as what the instruments do for cutting, sewing, for cauterizing, things like that.  When you're looking inside the console inside the patient, it almost feels like you're inside the abdomen."

He says the robotic surgery technique involves teamwork.  The skilled assistants help insure the process goes smoothly.  A smooth process equals a fast recovery.

"I went back to work about 3 weeks after.  I'm a nurse so I had to stay out a little longer than most patients do,  but after two weeks I felt great and I had to remind myself that I actually had surgery," says Cannon.

According to Dr. Maqueira, a traditional hysterectomy requires about four weeks of bed rest, but a robotic surgery requires only about a week of bed rest.