Modern Medicine: World's Smallest Long-Term Heart Monitor - WMBB News 13 - The Panhandle's News Leader

Modern Medicine: World's Smallest Long-Term Heart Monitor

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Bay County, Fla. -

A device the size of a paper clip is being used for long-term monitoring of cardiac patients.  It received FDA approval early this year and is now being used at Bay Medical-Sacred Heart.

Gayle McGill was a candidate for the Medtronic Reveal Cardiac Monitoring Device. 

"I was fainting with no real reason for it, and they had done some tests and nothing showed anything," explains McGill. 

That's when Dr. Hari Baddigam injected the device into McGill's chest.

Dr. Baddigam says, "This is a new era we are going to.  Before we used to put implantable monitors...now it's injectable monitors."

The procedure is quick and patients don't even know the monitor is there because it's so small.

According to Dr. Baddigam, the device is "80% less than the size of what it was before and without a scar. That's a huge advantage, especially females and so forth."

The device allows physicians to continuously monitor a patient's heart to ensure an accurate diagnosis.

The data is transmitted wirelessly so the doctor can diagnose the cardiac arrhythmia, or irregular heartbeat, without the patient having to be in the hospital.

"You can work.  I still work, you can drive.  You can do anything you want to do.  This just keeps me from wearing a bulky something or from running back and forth to tests and things like that," McGill says with a smile.

The tiny, injectable heart monitor can be used to monitor patients for up to three years.